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A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)

  • Category: Pics  |
  • 23 Sep, 2016  |
  • Views: 4084  |
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Photographer Adam Lyakh spent a year documenting the life of Romanian gypsies living on the outskirts of Wrocław, and this is what he saw.

1 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


2 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


3 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


4 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


5 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)



6 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


7 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


8 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


9 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


10 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


11 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


12 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


13 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


14 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


15 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


16 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


17 A Day In The Life Of Romanian Gypsies Living On The Polish border (17 pics)


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№1 Author: ZZ9PluralZAlpha (23 Sep 2016 04:12) Total user comments: 82


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Well, yeah, but living this lifestyle is a choice these people have made. The only reason i do not live like this, is because i chose to go out and get a job. Nothings stopping these people doing the same.
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№2 Author: YdieresiS (23 Sep 2016 12:15) Total user comments: 52


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This is not a choice for them. The Romanian government does not acknowledge them, so they can not get work, they don't have rights on anything and so on. I have done some volunteering work over there on the garbage dump in Cluj Napoca. Just search Pata Rat on google. These people also don't choose to live like this. When they had comfotable homes, they have been kicked out by the government. On Pata Rat they live of collecting sellable stuff in the garbage and sell these. They have horrible living circumstances.

So they don't choose to live like this. They try to make the best out of it, but don't choose this.
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№3 Author: velio70 (23 Sep 2016 16:57) Total user comments: 1746


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Quote: YdieresiS
This is not a choice for them. The Romanian government does not acknowledge them, so they can not get work, they don't have rights on anything and so on. I have done some volunteering work over there on the garbage dump in Cluj Napoca. Just search Pata Rat on google. These people also don't choose to live like this. When they had comfotable homes, they have been kicked out by the government. On Pata Rat they live of collecting sellable stuff in the garbage and sell these. They have horrible living circumstances.

So they don't choose to live like this. They try to make the best out of it, but don't choose this.


They DO choose to be like this. It's their culture. They won't settle, they won't work. They HAVE been given opportunities, but they refuse to live remotely like normal human beings. They purposely mutilate their children so they are better beggars. Give them a house and they'll rip it to shreds within months. Put them in an apartment building and they bring in their animals and use it like a f*cking barn.

People are tired of them. They steal, they beg, refuse education, and live within their own cast system. You'll find huge disgustedly tacky mansions owned by gypsy families that treat their own like dirt. All money stolen and gathered by the lower cast flows upward.

Finally, they aren't "Romanian" gypsies. Romania is a beautiful country filled with citizens that are hard working who care about their country. Gypsies don't identify with any nation or follow their laws. Every country in Eastern Europe has gypsies. They breed like rabbits and are a complete drain of any system that tries to help them.

In all honesty, they need to be sterilized. This culture needs to die.
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№4 Author: mikerowave (23 Sep 2016 21:34) Total user comments: 536


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- What is the last thing you want to hear from a gipsy? "Good morning neighbour!"

- How a gipsy being called when he wears suit and tie? "Defendant, stand up!"

And trust me, these kind of jokes are based on experience, not just simple prejudices.
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№5 Author: Hory (24 Sep 2016 23:14) Total user comments: 347


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I disagree with most of your points. If it's in their culture it means EXACTLY that they don't choose to live like this. Did you choose your culture by any chance? I was born as an ethnic Romanian, it wasn't my choice. What an idiotic thing to say. Anger and strong emotions will not solve this issue.

Fair enough though. These are probably Polish gypsies since they're in Poland. Why would they go from living like sh*t in Romania to living like sh*t in Poland?

The level of democratic development in a country can be measured by how it treats its prisoners and minorities.

I have lived most of my life in a neighbourhood dominated in numbers by gypsies. I have seen and experienced bad things. But also have received unconditional love and respect; actually, physically, the gypsy quarter is divided between a small bit of gypsies usually associated with unemployment and crime, then the other part, much larger, has a large proportion of employed and even business owners.

My father is in such a position that it gives him access within the community so he runs social integration and educational classes. It is incredibly hard, but at good 4-5% of the population, it's not possible to avoid the issue or treat them in a raw, extermination-like way. However much some would like that.

The state has a weak system for Romanians themselves; catering for minorities as well is hard enough. Of course Hungarians and Germans have a special position due to the history we share, but gypsies have been treated as slaves, as lower beings, for hundreds of years. The trauma of trusting anyone else than themselves follows them for generations and when having no education and kids at 15, it's hard not to pass on certain habits.

There have been studies done and there are steps which we can take to better this situation. But without social willingness and a lot of patience, it will be difficult.
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